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Tag Archives: cancer

Immune therapy takes a ‘BiTE’ out of brain cancer

Building on their research showing that an exciting new form of immunotherapy for cancer has activity in patients with glioblastoma, the most common and most deadly form of brain cancer, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have created a new method

Psychological support ‘not available’ to one in three cancer patients who need it

People with cancer have trouble accessing appropriate psychological support, a new global report published today by the All.Can international cancer initiative reveals. Patient insights on cancer care: opportunities for improving efficiency reveals findings from the international All.Can patient survey, in

T2DM increases gastric cancer risk after H. pylori eradication

(HealthDay)—Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk for gastric cancer after treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection, according to a study published online July 11 in Diabetes Care. Ka Shing Cheung, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., from The University of Hong Kong, and colleagues

Breast cancer research could expand lung cancer therapies

New research into a genetic mutation’s role in breast cancer could open new treatment options for lung cancer, according to a Michigan State University scientist. “We sequenced the whole genome of breast cancer samples and found a driving mutation that

Cancer lab on chip to enable widespread screening, personalized treatment

A new generation of pathology labs mounted on chips is set to revolutionize the detection and treatment of cancer by using devices as thin as a human hair to analyze bodily fluids. The technology, known as microfluidics, promises portable, cheap

Delay from breast cancer diagnosis to chemotherapy after an operation may shorten survival

Women with breast cancer should start postoperative chemotherapy, when recommended, ideally within four months of their cancer diagnosis because new study findings show that waiting longer is associated with poorer overall survival. The study, which used nationwide data, is published

Overstuffed cancer cells may have an Achilles’ heel

In a study using yeast cells and data from cancer cell lines, Johns Hopkins University scientists report they have found a potential weak spot among cancer cells that have extra sets of chromosomes, the structures that carry genetic material. The

Infrared chemical imaging technology promises new precision cancer diagnosis

More than 174,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year, according to the American Cancer Society, putting it behind only skin cancer as the most common cancer among American men. Ji-Xin Cheng, adjunct professor of Purdue’s Weldon School

More cancer patients get help to quit smoking

When patients who smoke begin cancer treatment at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis—or at any of Siteman’s satellite locations—they also now receive advice about quitting smoking, referrals to easy-access smoking-cessation

Dosing regimen for an old cancer drug shows new promise as an immunotherapy

As cancer cells progress, they accumulate hundreds and even thousands of genetic and epigenetic changes, resulting in protein expression profiles that are radically different from that of healthy cells. But despite their heavily mutated proteome, cancer cells can evade recognition

Researchers unlock clues to improving cancer treatment

A research project led by The University of Western Australia in collaboration with Telethon Kids Institute and 13 health research organizations has identified key differences between cancers that respond to immunotherapy and those that do not. The breakthrough, which has

Salt regulations linked to 9,900 cases of cardiovascular disease and 1,500 cancer cases

A relaxation of UK industry regulation of salt content in food has been linked with 9,900 additional cases of cardiovascular disease, and 1,500 cases of stomach cancer. Researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Liverpool analysed the salt

Daily coffee doesn’t affect cancer risk

Drinking coffee does not change a person’s risk of being diagnosed with or dying from cancer, a new QIMR Berghofer study has found. The research findings have been published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. Senior author and head of

Crunching the numbers of cancer metastasis

In metastasis, cancer cells break away from the original tumor and take root in another region of the body by entering the blood stream. In order to spread, metastatic cells cross over the endothelium—a barrier of endothelial cells lining the

Broken heart syndrome linked with cancer

One in six people with broken heart syndrome had cancer and they were less likely to survive for five years after it occurred, according to new international research in Journal of the American Heart Association. Broken heart syndrome, also called

Making cancer stem cells visible to the immune system

Leukemia stem cells protect themselves against the immune defense by suppressing a target molecule for killer cells. This protective mechanism can be tricked with drugs. In the journal Nature, scientists from Basel, Tübingen and Heidelberg describe the new therapeutic approaches

Cancer device created at rutgers to see if targeted chemotherapy is working

Rutgers researchers have created a device that can determine whether targeted chemotherapy drugs are working on individual cancer patients. The portable device, which uses artificial intelligence and biosensors, is up to 95.9 percent accurate in counting live cancer cells when

Study identifies potential markers of lung cancer

By examining both blood samples and tumor tissues from patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have identified markers that can distinguish between major subtypes of lung cancer and can accurately identify lung cancer stage.

Many perceive lack of choice in receipt of RAI for thyroid cancer

(HealthDay)—Many patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer perceive that they have no choice about receiving radioactive iodine (RAI), according to a study published online July 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Lauren P. Wallner, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University

Unlocking chemo-resistance in cancer

La Trobe University researcher Associate Professor Hamsa Puthalakath is the first scientist to have unlocked a long-standing mystery as to why some cancers do not respond to treatment with one of the most effective chemotherapy drugs: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). “We are

An inflammatory diet correlates with colorectal cancer risk

Researchers from the Molecular Mechanisms and Experimental Therapy in Oncology program (Oncobell) of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), together with the Biodonostia Health Research Institute (IIS Biodonostia), among others, have published in

Cancer tissue-freezing approach may help more breast cancer patients in lower income countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

Greater prevalence of anal cancer precursors for women living with HIV than prior reports

The prevalence of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), which precede anal cancer, is much higher in women living with HIV than previously reported, a multi-site, national study involving hundreds of patients has found. Conducted by researchers from the AIDS

Ford vehicles to deploy 5G brain cancer technology in vehicles by 2020, frying your brain while you drive

Ford has announced that it will deploy cellular vehicle-to-everything (C-V2X) technology in all of its new American car models from the year 2022 onward. The technology will enable vehicles to communicate with one another as well as traffic management infrastructure