• Judge temporarily blocks new Arkansas anti-abortion laws

Compensatory strategies to disguise autism spectrum disorder may delay diagnosis

First scientific study of compensatory strategies—techniques to camouflage autism—finds that they have positive and negative outcomes, increasing social integration, but possibly also resulting in poor mental health for autistic people, and could be a barrier to diagnosis. For the first

E. coli superbug strains can persist in healthy women’s guts

A recent study of over 1,000 healthy women with no symptoms of urinary tract infections showed nearly 9 percent carried multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains in their guts. This is of clinical concern because disease-causing E. coli bacteria can transfer

Hit your head, lose your sense of smell

It’s long been known that people who suffer a major concussion can lose their sense of smell temporarily and also develop affective problems, such as anxiety and depression. Now scientists have found that’s true even for people who get a

Study: Fat cells play key role in dangerous transformation of melanoma

Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Carmit Levy and Dr. Tamar Golan of the Department of Human Genetics and Biochemistry at TAU’s Sackler School of Medicine, have discovered that fat cells are involved in the transformation that melanoma

Researchers unlock access to pain relief potential of cannabis

University of Guelph researchers are the first to uncover how the cannabis plant creates important pain-relieving molecules that are 30 times more powerful at reducing inflammation than Aspirin. The discovery unlocks the potential to create a naturally derived pain treatment

Folic acid reduces risk of neural tube defects linked to HIV drug dolutegravir

Dolutegravir is a preferred medication for treating HIV infection, but it recently has been linked to a 6- to 9-fold increase in the risk for neural tube defects among babies born to mothers receiving the drug during early gestation. Researchers

The research effort on acute flaccid myelitis

Johns Hopkins Medicine and University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) researchers will lead a multicenter, multinational study of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), the “poliolike” condition affecting children that causes loss of muscle control. The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute

Vision scientist says evolution has trained humans to construct reality, rather than to see the world as it truly is

Perception is not objective reality. Case in point: The above image is stationary and flat …just try telling your brain that. In his new book, The Case Against Reality, UCI cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman applies this concept to the whole

New implant, vaccine trial offer fresh HIV hope

A matchstick-sized implant could revolutionise HIV prevention regimes after early trials suggested the device could stop at-risk people contracting the virus for up to a year at a time, new research showed Tuesday. Unveiling their findings from a clinical trial

Researchers get a handle on how to control blood sugar after stroke

Hyperglycemia, or high levels of glucose, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke and is associated with worse outcomes compared to normal blood sugar levels. Animal studies also pointed to an effect of high blood sugar in worsening stroke

Screen every pregnant woman for hep B: Task force

(HealthDay)—All pregnant women should be screened early for hepatitis B, to prevent the viral infection from being passed to newborns. So says the latest guideline from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. “Clinicians can help mothers and their babies by

Semi-automated contracting system to accelerate partnering in AI-powered drug discovery

One of the main impediments in partnerships between the AI companies and biotechnology companies is contracting. Legal contracts for target identification and small molecule generation can be incredibly complex, especially when the parties do not have experience in partnering on

Is Instagram behavior motivated by a desire to belong?

Does a desire to belong and perceived social support drive a person’s frequency of Instagram use? The relationship between these motivating factors as predictors of Instagram use are published in a new study in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a

AHA news: Early pregnancy may be a prime time to promote heart health

Improving cardiovascular health during the early stages of pregnancy can lead not only to a healthier pregnancy, it also can greatly improve a woman’s long-term heart health, new research shows. The findings, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American

MGUS can progress to multiple myeloma within five years

(HealthDay)—Individuals with low- or intermediate-risk monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) can experience progression to multiple myeloma within five years, according to a study published online July 18 in JAMA Oncology. Ola Landgren, M.D., Ph.D., from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer

Statistical analyses reveal the shape of epileptic seizures

Pyramidal graphs resulting from statistical analyses of EEG recordings can improve our understanding of epileptic seizures. A statistical approach squeezes more detailed information out of a current method of measuring brain signals in epileptic seizures, adding new insight into how

Type of stent affects immediate and long-term outcomes

A new study comparing the outcomes of different types of stents used to treat cerebral aneurysms shows that the type of stent used affects a patient’s immediate and long-term health outcomes. The study was presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional

T2DM increases gastric cancer risk after H. pylori eradication

(HealthDay)—Type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk for gastric cancer after treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection, according to a study published online July 11 in Diabetes Care. Ka Shing Cheung, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., from The University of Hong Kong, and colleagues

Microfluidics device helps diagnose sepsis in minutes

A novel sensor designed by MIT researchers could dramatically accelerate the process of diagnosing sepsis, a leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals that kills nearly 250,000 patients annually. Sepsis occurs when the body’s immune response to infection triggers an

Hands-on dads more prone to jealousy in the face of infidelity

A new international study has found fathers who invest time and money in their children are likely to be more jealous when their partner cheats on them compared with dads who are less involved. Dr. Geoff Kushnick, an anthropologist at

Reducing air pollution could cut rates of childhood asthma

(HealthDay)—Statistical models demonstrate how targeting certain air pollutants could reduce the incidence of childhood asthma, according to a study published online July 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Erika Garcia, M.P.H., Ph.D., from the Keck School

Fingerprint of multiple sclerosis immune cells identified

Researchers at the University of Zurich have identified a cell population that likely plays a key role in multiple sclerosis (MS). T helper cells in the blood of MS patients infiltrate the central nervous system, where they can cause inflammation

Stem cell therapy furthers research for infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome

A phase I clinical trial is the first research monitored by the Food and Drug Administration that demonstrates the potential of regenerative therapy for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) through collecting, processing and injecting an infant’s own stem cells directly

Scientists map our underappreciated ‘little brain’

Scientists at UC Berkeley and Western University in Canada have used brain imaging to map the cerebellum, a formerly underappreciated neural region that contains the vast majority of the brain’s neurons, hence its Latin moniker “little brain.” The results of