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Category Archives: GastroIntestinal

New study finds both components of blood pressure predict heart attack, stroke risk

Both numbers in a blood pressure reading—the “upper” systolic and the “lower” diastolic—independently predicted the risk of heart attack or stroke in a very large Kaiser Permanente study that included more than 36 million blood pressure readings from more than

HIV vaccine nears clinical trial following new findings

A promising vaccine that clears an HIV-like virus from monkeys is closer to human testing after a new, weakened version of the vaccine has been shown to provide similar protection as its original version. A pair of papers published July

First US murder conviction overturned using DNA, family tree evidence

An American man was exonerated Wednesday for a decades-old murder he did not commit, using evidence based on DNA and a genetic family tree, the first such result using a revolutionary investigative technique. Christopher Tapp, 43, had served 20 of

One in 270 births have ‘dual burden’ of prematurity and severe maternal complications

A quarter of women who have serious maternal complications during childbirth also have premature births, posing a “dual burden” on families, finds research from NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) California Preterm Birth

Shaky scaffold changes lung infrastructure

Our lungs work tirelessly all through the day to keep us breathing, seamlessly expanding and contracting. When lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred, it can lose its flexibility, making it harder to breathe. Lung scarring can lead to diseases like

Emotion-detection applications built on outdated science, report warns

Software that purportedly reads emotions in faces is being deployed or tested for a variety of purposes, including surveillance, hiring, clinical diagnosis, and market research. But a new scientific report finds that facial movements are an inexact gauge of a

Researchers deploy a novel mobile lab for rapid, real-time pathogen testing in the field

University of Minnesota researchers have refined testing methods for tick-borne diseases in the field by using a new, deployable mobile laboratory and performing genetic sequencing of key pathogens to better understand how they move, evolve and function. The U of

Promising system delivers chemo drug straight into tumors with fewer side effects

A stealthy new drug-delivery system disguises chemotherapeutics as fat in order to outsmart, penetrate and destroy tumors. Thinking the drugs are tasty fats, tumors invite the drug inside. Once there, the targeted drug activates, immediately suppressing tumor growth. The drug

Should obesity be recognized as a disease?

With obesity now affecting almost a third (29%) of the population in England, and expected to rise to 35% by 2030, should we now recognise it as a disease? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. Obesity, in which

Marijuana use may not make parents more ‘chill’

Sorry, marijuana moms and dads: Using pot may not make you a more relaxed parent, at least when it comes to how you discipline your children. A study of California parents found that current marijuana users administered more discipline techniques

Preventing biofilm formation to reduce the risk of hospital infections

Some people who are hospitalized feel worse rather than better. On average, 7 percent of all patients in industrial countries are affected by “nosocomial” infections. In intensive care units, the risk increases even more. This can result in serious illnesses

Creating a new type of food tracking app

Kim S., like half of mobile phone users, has an application to track her daily eating and fitness. But Kim is newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and wants to start tracking the glycemic index of her food, her blood

Scientists find a way to reduce sugar in drinks

Research has shown that increasing the pH level of water could help tackle obesity and health problems caused by high sugar content in drinks. Scientists at De Montfort University Leicester (DMU) have been working with University of Sheffield, Innovate UK

Self-injuring young girls overestimate negative feedback in social media simulation

Adolescent girls who self-injure feel that they receive more negative feedback than they actually receive, and are more sensitive to “thumbs down” responses, compared to other adolescent girls. These are the findings presented by Irene Perini, researcher at Center for

A better way to treat hypothermia

Although most of the western hemisphere is sweating in the summer heat, a team of U of M researchers are keeping cool by finding more efficient ways to tackle hypothermia. High-powered heated blankets (through a system called forced-air warming) are

Research associates independent travel with better mental health

New research from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin highlights the importance of older adults being able to travel independently—whether by driving themselves or taking public transport. The research, recently published in the journal Transportation

Neighborhood environment and health

It is well understood that urban black males are at a disproportionately high risk of poor health outcomes. But little is known about how the neighborhood environments where these men live contribute to their health. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers

Many patients with depression do not need a psychiatrist

(HealthDay)—Primary care doctors can detect and treat most cases of depression, according to a study published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine. Manish K. Jha, M.D., from UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues retrospectively

Wake up your breakfast with delicious whole grains

(HealthDay)—If you’re looking to change up that sugary bowl of cold cereal, quinoa and amaranth are nutritious alternatives. These tiny grains (they’re actually seeds) make excellent and hearty breakfasts, and are rich in iron, protein and magnesium along with many

Exercises to head off a painful rotator cuff injury

(HealthDay)—The rotator cuff refers to a group of four distinct muscles and tendons that connect to each shoulder and stabilize the humerus, the upper arm bone. These muscles are engaged when you move your shoulder, and work together to give

Health insurance idea could help millions of Americans spend less

Millions of Americans with chronic conditions could save money on the drugs and medical services they need the most, if their health insurance plans decide to take advantage of a new federal rule issued today. And the idea behind that

Study shows female brain responds to porn the same as male brain

A small team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics has found evidence that suggests the female brain responds to pornography in the same ways as the male brain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the

Massive potential health gains in switching to active transport

Swapping short car trips for walking or biking could achieve as much health gain as ongoing tobacco tax increases, according to a study from the University of Otago, New Zealand. Lead author Dr. Anja Mizdrak, of Otago’s Burden of Disease

Sustainable savings on medical care

One popular idea for lowering the nation’s ballooning health care spending is to change the way insurers pay provider organizations for their care. Instead of paying a fee for each service rendered—a model that can encourage the unscrupulous use of