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Category Archives: Addiction

Fruit flies find their way by setting navigational goals

When a fruit fly decides it wants to walk in a particular direction, it sticks to its plan with impressive resolve. Now, Rockefeller scientists have begun to understand how insect brains make and meet navigational goals. In monitoring itinerant flies,

Research ‘paves the way’ for early interventions to prevent childhood inflammatory diseases

A study of newborn infants has identified a compound produced by gut bacteria that appears to predispose certain infants to allergies and asthma later in life. “We have discovered a specific bacterial lipid in the neonatal gut that promotes immune

Beyond finding a gene: Same repeated stretch of DNA found in three neurodegenerative diseases

Families living with four extremely rare neurodegenerative diseases have finally learned the cause of their illnesses, thanks to a researcher’s hunch and decades of improvements in DNA sequencing technology. Four rare diseases are all caused by the same short segment

Gut microbes may affect the course of ALS

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have shown in mice that intestinal microbes, collectively termed the gut microbiome, may affect the course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. As reported today in Nature, progression

Encephalitis identified as rare toxicity of immunotherapy treatment

After a cancer patient receiving an immunotherapy developed encephalitis and died 18 months into treatment, researchers at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) investigated why the complication occurred, performing a molecular analysis of the disease’s pathology and mining data to determine the

Genes linked to death from sepsis identified in mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the body’s immune response to infection spirals out of control. Bacteria in the bloodstream trigger immune cells to release powerful molecules called cytokines to quickly activate the body’s defenses. Sometimes the response

Evolutionary gene loss may help explain why only humans are prone to heart attacks

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say the loss of a single gene two to three million years ago in our ancestors may have resulted in a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in all humans as

Study finds Nunavik Inuit are genetically unique

A new study has found that an Inuit population in Canada’s Arctic are genetically distinct from any known group, and certain genetic variants are correlated with brain aneurysm. Geographically isolated populations often develop unique genetic traits that result from their

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer

American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows. Led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine, the study found that over a third (34

Obstructive sleep apnea may be one reason depression treatment doesn’t work

When someone is depressed and having suicidal thoughts or their depression treatment just isn’t working, their caregivers might want to check to see if they have obstructive sleep apnea, investigators say. That’s true even when these individuals don’t seem to

Researchers unveil experimental compound to block therapeutic target in blood cancer

Researchers at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered a hyperactive cell signal that contributes to tumor growth in an aggressive blood cancer. They also developed an experimental therapeutic to block the signal and slow tumor growth. The researchers

The opioid crisis: Drug overdose deaths are down for the first time in 30 years

Drug overdoses cause more deaths in the U.S. than gun violence, car accidents, or H.I.V. did when they reached their most lethal peaks. For almost three decades, the number of overdose deaths increased unabated. But, according to a recent government

Why declaring Ebola a public health emergency isn’t a silver bullet

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has declared the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. It took the decision based on International Health Regulations agreed in 2005. These require the

Warning to those wanting to spice up their lives

Think twice before adding that extra kick of chili sauce or chopped jalapeno to your meal. New research involving the University of South Australia shows a spicy diet could be linked to dementia. A 15-year study of 4582 Chinese adults

Heart disease biomarker linked to paleo diet

People who follow the paleo diet have twice the amount of a key blood biomarker linked closely to heart disease, the world’s first major study examining the impact of the diet on gut bacteria has found. Researchers from Edith Cowan

Use of non-hospital-based provider-to-patient telehealth grew nearly 1,400%

From 2014 to 2018, private insurance claim lines for non-hospital-based provider-to-patient telehealth grew 1,393 percent, according to a new white paper on telehealth from FAIR Health, a national, independent nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing transparency to healthcare costs and health

Combined online self-management for pain, associated anxiety and depression works

Pain is the most common physical symptom for which adults seek medical attention in the United States, while anxiety and depression are the most common mental health symptoms for which adults visit a doctor. Drugs, especially opioids, may not be

Despite progress, only three African nations expected to meet global breastfeeding goal

Only three African countries are expected to meet the global target for exclusive breastfeeding, “an unparalleled source of nutrition for newborns and infants, no matter where they are born,” according to a global health expert. The three nations, Guinea-Bissau, Rwanda,

The latest on caffeine limits

(HealthDay)—It seems as though every day brings yet another study on the effects of caffeine or coffee in particular. Researchers have looked at its effects on almost every aspect of health, from overall mortality to the heart, bones, kidneys, liver,

The great fat debate: How much is unhealthy?

(HealthDay)—Experts have redefined the role of fat in healthy eating, but before you grab a chunk of cheese or another pat of butter, understand the differences between the various types of fat in your diet. For decades, guidelines recommended limiting

Medicare for All unlikely to cause surge in hospital use

As political leaders debate the merits of a future Medicare for All system in the U.S., some analysts predict that implementing universal coverage could cause a sharp, unaffordable increase in hospital use and costs, overwhelming the system. But new research

Failure to launch: Parents are barriers to teen independence

Something most parents don’t want to hear from their teenager: I am not prepared to be an adult, and it’s your fault. Nearly all parents (97%) in a new national poll say they are helping their teen become more independent

Plasticizer interaction with the heart

Calling an ambulance during an emergency, emailing a breaking news or journal article before a 5 p.m. deadline and maintaining conditions during the fifth week of a 6-week lab study, without altering the light or temperature, requires electricity and translates

Audit: Hospitals put Native Americans at risk with opioids

Government hospitals placed Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit released Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of